About me

My name is Michael Kline, I'm a physics PhD student at The Ohio State University. My interests are in computational physics, particularly working with parallel computing architecture. My current research is on a search for dark, sterile neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the mentorship of Dr. Leah Broussard.




Technical Skills

  • Julia
  • CUDA
  • Numerical Simulations
  • Python
  • MATLAB
  • C++


Education

The Ohio State University
Doctor of Philosophy in Physics
Aug 2021 - Present
  • University Fellowship

Transylvania University
Bachelor of Arts in Physics and Mathematics
Sep 2018 - Dec 2020

Research Experience

Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Leah Broussard
Jan 2021 - Aug 2021

I created a simulation and performed data analysis for the search for mirror neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. I used CUDA and the Julia programming language to calculate the probability of detecting mirror neutrons in the experiment for tens of millions of points in the parameter space of interest.


Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Leah Broussard
Jun 2020 - Aug 2020

I created a simulation tracking the spin of neutrons in the measurement cell for the nEDM@SNS experiment to study systematic effects that could lead to a false EDM measurement. I used Julia and CUDA to create the simulation to run on Graphics Processing Units. I presented this work at the 2020 Fall Meeting of the APS Division of Nuclear Physics.


Optical Physics Research
Transylvania University
Stephen Johnson
May 2019 - Dec 2020

I created a simulation of transverse photothermal deflection spectroscopy. I used COMSOL Multiphysics to model the heat deposited on the sample by a broadband light source and the temperature dispersion throughout the cuvette. Then, I used Julia to trace light rays through the cuvette to determine the signal on the detector. This work was presented at the COMSOL Conference 2019 Boston.


Nuclear Physics Research
University of Kentucky
Christopher Crawford
Jan 2019 - Aug 2019

I used COMSOL Multiphysics and MATLAB to solve for and iteratively refine the windings of electromagnetic coils for the nEDM experiment. The windings were found using the equipotential contours of the magnetic scalar potential along the boundary of the coil. This work was presented at the COMSOL Conference 2019 Boston.


Conferences Attended

2020 Fall Meeting of the APS Division of Nuclear Physics
Oct 29 - Nov 1, 2020

COMSOL Conference 2019 Boston
Oct 2-4, 2019